Right! from the Start: Health Disparities and Birth Outcomes

Right! from the Start builds awareness of preterm birth and associated health outcomes, advocates for the needs of vulnerable children and families, and provides action oriented and evidence-based education to improve maternal and child health services. Activities are concentrated in the Delta region of Northwest Mississippi, but this initiative has the potential to inform work across the state. After a
two-year pilot phase, Right! from the Start is moving forward in 2013 with an expanded focus, including the promotion of breast feeding, an important strategy for improving health for all children, especially those born prematurely.

Right! from the Start is a collaborative program between Women and Children’s Health Initiatives and the Community Foundation of Northwest Mississippi. It is funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. The University of Mississippi Center for Population Studies (CPS) assists with this
program by providing research, development, and evaluation  services through the Institute for Community-Based Research.

This page provides information regarding health disparities and birth outcomes research associated with the Right! from the Start program, as well as other research initiatives through University of Mississippi Center for Population Studies and the Institute for Community-Based Research.

Publications:

Green, J.J., K. Kerstetter, M. Phillips, S.G. Harris, S. Snell, & D. Mitra. 2013. “Socioeconomic Vulnerabilities and Disparities in Preterm Birth Rates: Analysis of Mississippi Counties.” Population Brief. University, MS: The University of Mississippi Center for Population Studies/State Data Center of Mississippi.
Population Brief 2013 – Socioeconomic Conditions and Preterm Births (click on link)

Green, J.J., S.G. Harris, M. Phillips, & S. Snell. 2012. “Exploring Trends and Disparities in Preterm Birth in Mississippi.” Population Brief.  University, MS: The University of Mississippi Center for Population Studies/State Data Center of Mississippi.
Population Brief 2012 Trends and Disparities in Preterm Births (click on link)

Data:

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